Farnsworth Chronicles, 14


Cue to cue for The Farnsworth Invention stretched into a third day as the production is proving to be a technical challenge on a scale seldom seen on the Keyano Theatre stage.


"Remember, you guys have been living with this show for a long time," said Claude Giroux, director of the last play in the Keyano Theatre TELUS Drama Series.


"To the technical team, this is all pretty new."

They are doing an incredible job of picking up the rhythm, energy and nuance of this fascinating play written by the talented (and revered) Aaron Sorkin.  By the time we did a full dress last night, the lighting and sound operators, the stage manager, the assistant stage managers, dressers, and fly crew were humming.


Despite the enormous number of hours on stage - probably close to 20 since I left work on Friday - I was feeling energized as we moved from cue to cue into an actual full-energy, full-intention run.  It is during this period when things really coalesce and I find it absolutely intoxicating.


That is not to say that everything went perfectly.  I missed one important line, misspoke a couple of others, and was slightly late making an entrance after a quick change went askew.  One actor screamed in frustration backstage as a series of unfortunate events led to an unsuccessful and critical costume change.  Another player winced in pain as a piece of furniture being moved in the dark made contact with an area of his body that is particularly vulnerable.

We will continue to work through missed cues, scene changes not quite on mark, and quick costume changes that are the stuff of miracles.

At the end of the day, when this show previews on Thursday, the audience will enjoying an outstanding production, born out of thousands of hours of effort, talent and dedication.

As I stood in my spot, delivering my closing monologue, I felt the play move from my head to my heart. It was a powerful moment that I won't soon forget.

With Humberly Gonzalez who plays Mrs. Sarnoff
On this Alberta election day we are dark, which is to say we are not called for any rehearsals or performances.  Tomorrow night we go the distance with full costumes and make-up in preparation for the media call which happens on Wednesday night.  This is getting very real very quickly.

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